Art Tutorials
Emofuri Tutorial PART II! How to make a PSD (Half-fullbody)

princelupin:

image

hey everyone! Lupin here again with another Emofuri tutorial! this time, i’m gonna teach you all how to make a PSD to import into Emote/Emofuri! now, if you’ve already made your first Emofuri animation, this isn’t going to be very hard for you! this one, though, is more complicated and includes more folders and layers for various emotions! so yeah, this one’s definitely going to be larger. for this one, i will be using this template:

image

this one can be found in one of the Emote PSD template folders (there’s two, this one is in the first folder). i will also be using my Oni OC for this one (she’s got those demonic red eyes and horns, yo. just putting that out there!) (EDIT: she’s done!)

TUTORIAL LENGTH: Somewhat Long

DIFFICULTY:  (3.5/5 due to the insane amount of layers)

PROGRAM: Paint Tool SAI, Emofuri

OK! let’s get started, then! click the readmore if you’re interested!

Read More

How big should you make your art?

thefrogman:

I’ve noticed some digital artists out there who just kind of guess when choosing the dimensions of their artwork. Trying to understand ppi, dpi, print dimensions, and resolution can send you down a rabbit hole of complexity likely to break your brain.  

If you are creating an image only for the web, it is really up to you how big you want to make it. The only relevant dimensions are the pixels. Print size and pixels per inch are of no consequence. A 1920x1080 300ppi image will be the same as a 1920x1080 600ppi image. Your screen only cares about pixel dimensions.

If you plan to print your image, that is where things can get complicated.

Here is the simple version…

First you need to determine the maximum size that your work may be printed. Here are the most commonly used sizes for poster prints. 

image

Now you need to know the brand of printer that will be used. Typically it will be Epson, HP, or Canon.

For Epson printers…

  • Input the width and height. 
  • Input a resolution of 360 pixels per inch.

For Canon, HP, and most other printers…

  • Input the width and height. 
  • Input a resolution of 300 pixels per inch.

So let’s say you are in photoshop and you want your art to be printed at 11” x 17” on an Epson printer. This is how you should create your document. 

image

If you do not know how your work will be printed, I recommend erring on the side of “too big.” If you end up having to enlarge your work, it could result in some quality loss. 

Read More

kada-bura:

After a lot of asks and some flabbergasted tags about this post I made yesterday, I decided to throw a quick tutorial together on the steps I took to make some semi-real looking paper cut out art in SAI! Hope this clears it up and helps some others out who want to try this!

Point of View - The Complexities

writingbox:

On Tuesday, we looked at the basics of point of view; but there’s far more to it than simply choosing between 1st, 2nd and 3rd POVs.

The POV choice you make for your story will be based on a number of different factors, and will result in a number of different effects. It’s an important decision to make.

Let’s go back to 1st, 2nd and 3rd viewpoints.

1st Person:

  • Seeing a resurgence in popularity.
  • The usual choice for writing a story in the form of letters or diary entries (epistolary narrative voice).
  • Commonly used in the gothic horror and noir genres.
  • If used as 1st person limited, the reader only sees what the narrating character sees, hears, feels, thinks. They only go where the narrator goes, only sees through their eyes, which can be very limiting.
  • You can use 1st person omnisciently, so that the narrating character can see into the minds of all the characters. This is often used if the narrator is dead, or some kind of deity or supernatural being. You’d have to have a good reason for them to have so much insight.

2nd Person:

  • This is the least popular and most unusual choice for literature, which may alienate some readers.
  • It does bring them into the story, giving them a sense of intimacy to the characters and plot.
  • It can be a hard-sell, however. If you chose to use 2nd person narrative, you would have to have a very specific reason for doing it, and be sure that you can pull it off.

3rd Person:

  • The most common choice and what readers are most used to reading, so there is little or no learning curve.
  • 3rd Person Objective: there is no insight into the heads of any characters, allowing the narrator, and the reader, to view the story neutrally and objectively. More common in journalism, it disconnects the reader from the characters, and would be an unusual choice for fiction.
  • 3rd Person Limited/Subjective: the story is seen through the eyes of one or just a small number of characters. You do not know every character’s thoughts, only those chosen. Allows a wider viewpoint of the story than 1st person, but without opening it up to every single character.
  • 3rd Person Omniscient: the narrator can see into the head of every character. While previously the most popular POV, it is losing favour to a preference for 3rd Person Limited. It can become a little overwhelming for readers who, thrown quickly from head to head, find it difficult to get to know any one character enough to really empathise with them.

Unreliable Narrator:

  • For one reason or another, the narrating character is deemed untrustworthy. They may simply be naive or inexperienced, or they may be bias, or purposefully skewing the facts for their own gain.
  • Usually found in 1st person narrative.
  • They may omit information, either by accident or on purpose, or see things differently to the way anyone else would.
  • Examples of unreliable narrators could include children, characters with mental health issues, characters that are drunk or have drug addictions. It could include characters with amnesia or sensory impairments. It may simply be a character who is very modest and downplays their own part in the story.
  • Their unreliable nature may be evident from the start, or may only come to light further into the book.
  • While it can be used to great effect, it can run the risk of leaving readers feeling angry or frustrated.

Furthermore, you have the choice of past, present or future tense, which all lend themselves to different POVs in different ways.

And even so, this is still a bit of a whistle-stop tour to POV, and there are a lot more things to consider. If you are deciding to use a less common POV, go and read other books using the same one, see how it has been done well, and see how it has been done badly too.

costumecommunityservice:

[full size][full size]

Cannot stress how important it is to learn about what you are looking up beyond what it looks like.

A wise someone once said, “Learn something with the goal of being able to explain it later. If you can’t explain it, you haven’t actually learned anything.”

amandaonwriting:

If you are writing for fun, and if you don’t want any help, please write any way that works for you. I am not trying to convert you to writing with a plan. It truly does not matter to me how you write. However, if you are struggling to finish a book that makes sense, I would love you to carry on reading.

Why should you do it?

When I used to teach Writers Write regularly, one of the first things I asked students was: How does your story end? I did this for two reasons. Firstly, as much as some people love the idea of working with meandering storylines, it has been my experience that those writers seldom finish writing a coherent book. Secondly, most people who go to workshops or sign up for courses are truly looking for help, and I’ve learned that the best way to succeed in anything in life is to have a plan. Successful people will tell you that you need to know where you’re going before you begin.

Smell the roses

This does not mean that you can’t take time to smell the roses, or explore hidden paths along the way. It simply means that you always have a lifeline and when you get lost, it will be easier for you to find your way back again. Remember that readers like destinations. They love beginnings, middles, and endings. Why do you think fans are terrified that George R.R. Martin will die before he finishes A Song of Fire and Ice? They want to know how the story ends. 

Here are seven reasons why I suggest you write your ending first.

  1. If you know who the characters are at the end of the story, you will know how much you should reveal about them at the beginning. 
  2. You will be forced out of the ‘backstory hell’ that beginner writers inhabit and into the story the reader wants to read.
  3. Hindsight is an amazing thing. We all know how different life seems when we’re looking back. We can often tell where a problem began. We think about the ‘what ifs’ with the gift of hindsight. You can use this to your advantage in fiction writing.
  4. You will have something to work towards. Instead of aimlessly writing and hoping for the muse to show you the way, you will be able to pull the characters’ strings and write the words they need to get them from the beginning through the middle to the end.
  5. Plotting from the ending backwards saves you so much time because you will leave out stuff that isn’t meant to be there. You will not have to muddle through an overwritten first draft.
  6. Writing the end forces most of us out of our comfort zones. We have to confront the reality of what we are doing. It might not be as romantic as flailing around like a helpless maiden, but if you want writing to be your profession, it’s good to make the outcome visible. This is a way to show yourself that you are serious. The end gives you a goal to work towards.
  7. The ending is as important as the beginning. Good beginnings get people to read your first book. Great endings get readers to buy your second book.

There are a handful of famous authors, like Stephen King and George R.R. Martin, who say they don’t plot. I think they just don’t realise they are those rare authors – natural born storytellers, and that plotting is instinctive for them. I have interviewed many successfully published authors and I can revel that the majority of them do believe in plotting. They outline, in varying degrees, before they begin. And yes, most of them know what their ending will be. Why don’t you try it? What have you got to lose?

I truly hope this helps you write, and finish, your book.

by Amanda Patterson

If you enjoyed this article, you may also enjoy 10 (Amazingly Simple) Tips to Get You Back on The Writing Track and The Author’s Promise- two things every writer should do. You could also read The Top 10 Tips for Plotting and Finishing a Book.

writeworld:

Adequate foreshadowing is crucial in a successful novel as a tool both for building suspense and for adequately preparing the reader for future events. The eight tips below can help you to foreshadow effectively.

Read More →

Pixel Art Tutorial

makegames:


Note:
This tutorial was created in 2007 for my personal website. Some small tweaks have been made since then, but nothing too significant.

In this 10-step tutorial, I’ll teach you how to create a “sprite”, which is a stand-alone two-dimensional character or object. The term comes from video games, of course.

Creating pixel art is a skill I picked up because I needed graphics for my games. After a lot of practice, I became kinda handy with it, and started to see it more as actual art rather than just a tool. These days, pixel art is quite popular in game development and illustration.

This pixel tutorial was created many years ago to teach people the basic concepts behind pixel art, but I’ve streamlined it a lot since its first incarnation. There are other pixel tutorials around, but I find them to be overly-complicated and too wordy. Pixel art is not a science. You should never have to calculate a vector when doing pixel art.

Read More